Blog

State of the Site

State of the Site

The past twelve months represent a time when it “all came together” for the Trust and the Paul Revere Heritage Site. In November 2021, the Trust received the long-awaited Master Plan of the future Paul Revere Museum of Discovery and Innovation. The year’s community...

Celebrating Our Volunteers

Celebrating Our Volunteers

 We speak often of the origins of the Paul Revere Heritage Site and how a team of dedicated volunteers have brought this special parcel of land from industrial eyesore to the Site we know and love today. It was volunteers that have made all the programming and...

Museum Exhibits:  When a Map is More Than a Map

Museum Exhibits:  When a Map is More Than a Map

For this year’s Heritage Day special exhibit ‘Canton in Wartime’, the Trust experimented with methods of visitor engagement, including audio and interactive elements.  One of the most popular exhibits was the Map of Global Service created by the audience...

Paul Revere Heritage Site Plays Host to Lots of Fall Fun

Paul Revere Heritage Site Plays Host to Lots of Fall Fun

The programming at the Paul Revere Heritage Site continues to delight families and residents of all ages. Two fun events recently took place for the young and…young at heart.On September 23, the Site, in collaboration with the Canton Parks and Recreation Department,...

Profile of a Volunteer: Joyce Stenmon

Profile of a Volunteer: Joyce Stenmon

Much like the Paul Revere Heritage Site transformation, taking something others have abandoned and making it new and beautiful is an act Joyce Stenmon, creative consultant and education and exhibit designer for the Site, has been doing since her childhood.   With...

Tree Labeling Brings Education, Attention to the Common

Tree Labeling Brings Education, Attention to the Common

On Arbor Day, April 30, members of the Paul Revere Heritage Site labeled 20 varieties of trees that have recently been planted on the Paul Revere Heritage Common. The goal behind the Tree Labeling Project, spearheaded by Pat Cohen and Tom Birmingham, was to add...

The Indigenous People of Canton

The Indigenous People of Canton

For thousands of years the land we now call Canton was inhabited by the Neponset band of the Massachusett tribe. The Massachusett territory extended from what is today Salem to the North, Plymouth to the south, and Worchester to the west. The Neponset band’s seat of power was at the mountain that they called massa-adchu-es-et (today it is known as Great Blue Hill). Their territory extended down into the area they knew as Ponkapoag (today Canton, Stoughton, Sharon, Dedham, and Randolph).

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